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Benefits of Being Bilingual. The Growing Trend of Multilingualism.

Do you want your child to learn a second language so he or she can speak with non-English speaking relatives? Or do you want your baby to be bilingual, so they’ll someday be better equipped for travel, foreign language requirements in school, or the job market?

No matter what your motivation is, speaking two languages will benefit your children greatly.

If your goal is raising a bilingual child, you’ve got work to do! Let’s look at what you can expect and all the information you need to get started.The Growing Trend of Multilingualism

Residents in the U.S. are putting a higher emphasis on multilingualism than ever before. Some of that is by necessity — some parents and grandparents speak little or no English, so to converse with them a child has to learn a second language. But a lot of the language diversity in the U.S. is by choice instead of necessity.


The Growing Trend of Multilingualism

Residents in the U.S. are putting a higher emphasis on multilingualism than ever before. Some of that is by necessity — some parents and grandparents speak little or no English, so to converse with them a child has to learn a second language. But a lot of the language diversity in the U.S. is by choice instead of necessity.

Benefits of Being Bilingual

If you’re going to put all this time and effort into raising a bilingual child, it better has benefits. It’s not like you’re going to give up your few precious minutes of free time for something that doesn’t offer any rewards.

Bilingualism will benefit your baby in the future. Here are some of the ways it will help them:

  • An appreciation for other cultures: When a child learns another language, it opens up another world to them. They learn more than just words, they learn about a whole class of people and their customs. That can be invaluable for the rest of their lives.
  • They learn the world is a big and diverse place: It can be easy for children to feel like the whole world is their neighborhood or their town. Learning a foreign language forces, them to think of themselves as a global citizen.
  • Mental strength: Your child should experience a boost in their brain function no matter which age they begin to learn a second language. According to research, speaking a second language can lead to better concentration and even greater intelligence.
  • Landing that dream job: Speaking more than one language can make your child a more attractive candidate when they start looking for work someday.
  • Feeling more comfortable traveling: You never know what travel opportunities may come up for your child in the future. Many colleges offer programs in which students study abroad.
  • It helps improve memory and may delay dementia: Some studies have shown that additional languages can improve the memories of both adults and children. Other studies have shown a correlation between learning another language and delayed dementia, although that link hasn’t been conclusively verified. Still, if you have a family history of dementia, it wouldn’t hurt to learn that second language along with your child.
  • Examine your reasons: If you’re teaching bilingualism because you want your child to have an advantage later in life, you may want to pick a popular language that’s spoken by a lot of people. Good picks include Chinese, Spanish, French, or German.
  • You know a foreign language: If you already know a language, that may be a compelling reason to teach that one. You’ll be able to impart your knowledge to your child while brushing up on your skills.
  • Whether you have an instructor nearby for that language: If you have a neighbour, a relative, or a friend who knows a foreign language, it makes sense to at least consider that one since you’ll have accessible resources. Otherwise, you’ll have to look at if there is a teacher nearby that can be hired — you might not have many language choices in smaller towns or rural areas though.
  • What your child wants: Older children may have a strong feeling about which language they want to learn. If they have a certain language in mind, let them pick that. They’ll be more motivated if they have a say in what they’re learning.